• Vengeance
  • Wormhole
  • Asteroid - Blue
  • Asteroid - Green/Yellow
  • Plasma Planet
  • Asteroid - Purple
  • Intaki VI and Asteroids
  • Intaki Prime
  • Oceania
  • Ringed Planet
  • Golden Pod
  • SakBat
  • Classic Sakaane Eionell
  • Sakaane Eionell
  • Warp Tunnel Distortion
  • Asteroid City
  • Peyote Lake
  • Bighorns
  • Grizzly
  • White Anemone
  • Bleeding Heart
  • Purple Anemone
  • Bryce Canyon
  • Waterton
  • Foothills
  • Iceland
  • Red Sunset
  • White Tiger
  • Red Panda
  • Lightbeams
  • Orange Fungi
  • Grapes
  • Daenan
  • Arlayn
  • Stream
  • Berwen

Yearly archives: 2014

ILF Celebrates Eight Years

Today was the Intaki Liberation Front’s eighth anniversary.

A lot can happen to a corporation in eight years—and ILF is no exception—but our goals remain the same today as they were in YC108: campaign for Intaki independence, fight against piracy, and improve the local economy. It takes a lot of dedication and passion to remain true to objectives like these. Ultimately, I think we have been able to maintain these missions for so long because at their heart they have one thing in common: the desire to improve the lives of the baseline and capsuleer populations in the Intaki sovereignty. We’re here to help others.

As I look back on ILF’s history I see a rich tapestry of wins, losses, lessons, and achievements.


New Eden Yule

December is often a quiet time of year around the IPI offices. Many of my pilots take leave to return home, spend time with their families, and observe the yule holiday that is celebrated by some of the New Eden cultures. I hope they enjoy themselves.

Tonight I worked late on a detailed report for our systems maintenance team—possibly in the near future they are going to overhaul the framework I must use daily to maintain ILF’s and IPI’s data, and I can’t wait for the day they do!—and after several hours, just as I was about to turn in for the night, a note—a very special note, as it turns out—arrived via my neocom accompanied by a delivery notice to my personal hangar. Both were from Richard Masseri, one of my members.

I wasn’t the only recipient; Richard showered all of the active ILF pilots with gifts! I can’t help but be touched by his selfless generosity. I’m also delightfully amused by the obvious thought and creativity he put into his yule gift to us:


“Little Things” for the Corporation UI

A CEO's nightmare.

A CEO’s nightmare.

The other day CCP Punkturis asked the playerbase to describe its “biggest pain points in the corp interface”. Wow, what a can of worms! Naturally, roles and titles are at the top of everyone’s list, including mine, and rightly so. It is by far the biggest pain point any CEO has to deal with in EVE Online. But then, forty-five posts into the thread, CCP Punkturis and CCP Sharq both backtracked to say, well, no, they weren’t really looking for the “biggest” pain points, they actually just want little things—the low-lying fruit—that might be easy to fix to help CEOs out.

If you’re a CEO, or have ever been a CEO at any time (even if for just five seconds!), do yourself and all CEOs everywhere a favor and post in that thread. Post even if everything you want to say about how godawful the corporation interface is has already been said by everyone else before you. Reiteration and repetition of these same pain points by multiple voices will help drive home their importance to the devs. It’s worth it.

And yes, mention roles and titles anyway. Pay no attention to the devs’ insistence that they aren’t looking at roles and titles right now. Do eeet anyway.

I already posted my thoughts in the thread, starting here. It took my entire evening and three forum posts to cover everything I wanted to say but it was definitely time well spent if it makes a difference for the future. :) Here it is, for posterity’s sake:


Now for the Hard Part

I’ve finished reposting content to Incyanity and feel pretty good about the state the site is in now. Hallelujah!

Using Joomla to manage the backend is something I kind of wish I had discovered years back, as I realize now how much time it would have saved me. After all, Incyanity has been around in various forms and at various URLs since 1999. Anybody remember GeoCities? I started out in the coveted Area51 block. Yeah. Fifteen years of literally spending days coding in Notepad and Notepad++, learning HTML, CSS, PHP, and a bit of JavaScript from scratch and by examining the source code of other websites, and then being forced to go back and redo whenever the standards changed, things were depreciated, etc.


Sphere Attack

This tutorial will teach you one method for creating a fabulous-looking sphere of energy that can be used to simulate a magical attack in your artwork. It was created using Photoshop CS2 for PC. Newer versions may need slightly different steps. It also assumes that you are somewhat familiar with the software. :)

In order to complete this tutorial, first you need to follow the Lighting and Colored Energy tutorial to at least step 3 (step 4 if you want color in your sphere). Although following the tutorials exactly will help you replicate the same effect that I created, the best way to learn is to experiment and create your own results!

Let’s begin!


Space Art

I LOVE space art. I’ve done a few pics which feature space as backgrounds or as the primary subject. It’s a great way to express your creativity because there is still so much we don’t know about space. Artists aren’t limited by “reality”—who’s to say what really is and isn’t possible out there? The void can be as beautiful or as harrowing—or both—as your imagination desires.

Space art takes quite a bit of effort and patience to make it look good and believable. I’ve spent upwards of six hours working on a single image. The artists I admire can spend double or more than that. There’s a lot of intuition involved, especially regarding color usage, shapes, etc. From what I’ve experienced so far, it takes a lot of practice. The results are oh so rewarding though!

I’m just learning and still experimenting with space art myself, so at this time I don’t feel I should be offering a tutorial of my own making. There are a number of fabulous tutorials out there that I have used (or are planning on using) to help me break into this art form, and my purpose here is to share them with you so that you can try them out and start making your own art.

I do not take credit for any of the tutorials linked below. Please respect the authors’ wishes if their tutorials list restrictions and give credit where credit is due. :) And have fun!

Exploding Planet
Planet Rings
Sun Tutorial

I also recommend the LunarCell, SolarCell, and Glitterato Photoshop plug-ins from Flaming Pear, though these plugins could be considered “cheating” and it’s usually much better to learn how to create the same effects manually. :)


Lightning and Colored Energy

To add realistic-looking lightning or a great magical effect to your artwork, follow this tutorial! The tutorial was created using Photoshop 7.0 for PC. Newer versions may need slightly different steps. It also assumes that you are somewhat familiar with the software. :)

Although following the tutorial exactly will help you replicate the same effect that I created, the best way to learn is to experiment and create your own results!

Let’s begin!


Digital Inking

The Freeform Pen tool is a fabulous alternative for artists who are not fond of inking their sketches. Some reasons you might not want to ink the sketch are:

  • not wanting to ruin the sketch if a mistake is made;
  • the pic is on lined or otherwise unsuitable paper for the finished product;
  • you don’t own a light table;
  • you are going to CG the picture instead of coloring it with traditional media.

Using the Freeform Pen tool to outline (digitally ink) the sketch allows you to create lineart that is perfect for CGing on the first try. The lineart will already be on its own layer and it will be 100% clean—no smudges or other souveniers from the sketch will remain to hamper coloring efforts!

The Freeform Pen tool can be a bit intimidating and frustrating if you’ve never used it before, so this tutorial is designed to help you become familiar with it. It does take a bit of practice and patience to get the hang of it, so don’t give up if you don’t get it right away!

This tutorial was created using Photoshop CS2 for PC. Newer versions may need slightly different steps. It also assumes that you are somewhat familiar with the software. :)

Although following the tutorial exactly will help you replicate the same effect that I created, the best way to learn is to experiment and create your own results! There are also many effects you can incorporate to the lineart while you are creating it, such as setting pressure sensitivity if you have a tablet or using different brush types for different styles of lines. For this tutorial I won’t be showing those advanced techniques. Experiment on your own after you’ve learned the basics. :)

Let’s begin!


Digital Coloring

There are many ways to use Photoshop to color lineart. This tutorial demonstrates the method I use. It was created using Photoshop CS2 for PC. Newer versions may need slightly different steps. It also assumes that you are somewhat familiar with the software. :)

Coloring art in a program like Photoshop is not only fun (because you can get very creative using the tools and filters) but it can also save you time and materials, since you don’t have to worry about dry markers, broken pencils, or possibly starting over because of a mistake! You can also recolor the same image many times to see how different color combinations look.

Although following the tutorial exactly will help you replicate the same effect that I created, the best way to learn is to experiment and create your own results!

Before moving to this stage, I prepared my lineart using the steps outlined in my Digital Inking tutorial.

Let’s begin!


Chapter Ten

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