• Peyote Lake
  • Bighorns
  • Grizzly
  • White Anemone
  • Bleeding Heart
  • Purple Anemone
  • Bryce Canyon
  • Waterton
  • Foothills
  • Iceland
  • Red Sunset
  • White Tiger
  • Red Panda
  • Lightbeams
  • Orange Fungi
  • Grapes
  • Daenan
  • Arlayn
  • Stream
  • Alindar

Tag: myst series

The Fifth Age: Riven – Day Five


realMyst
Riven – Day One | Riven – Day Two | Riven – Day Three | Riven – Day Four | Riven – Day Five


At long last, I return to Riven to finish my playthrough. This is the final post for this particular installment of the Myst series. I’m tickled pink that I was able to get through the entire story of the Fifth Age in five parts! Next I’ll move on to Myst III: Exile.

A rich tapestry of the D’ni number five.

When I left off last time, the prison book had been returned to me by the Black Moiety and I had picked up enough information to allow me to finally solve the puzzle of the golden domes. All I have left to do is confront (and hopefully trap) Gehn, free Catherine, and help save the Rivenese.

Riven, like Myst before it, has multiple endings depending on choices made by the player. Come with me to find out how I finished my journey!

Fair warning: if you’ve never played Riven, there are spoilers ahead!


The Fifth Age: Riven – Day Four


realMyst
Riven – Day One | Riven – Day Two | Riven – Day Three | Riven – Day Four | Riven – Day Five


I recently got an itch to revisit the Myst series of games. The serene yet subtly disturbing puzzle-oriented mysteries of Myst and Riven were ground-breaking for their day. I’m a gamer today primarily because of this universe.

The number five in an ornate gate.

The number five in an ornate gate.

It’s been a while since the last post in this series, so definitely time to get back to solving the mysteries of the Fifth Age!

I feel I’m nearly done Riven. Things are quickly coming to a head between me, Gehn, and the Black Moiety.

Come with me as I continue my journey!

Fair warning: if you’ve never played Riven, there are spoilers ahead!


The Fifth Age: Riven – Day Three


realMyst
Riven – Day One | Riven – Day Two | Riven – Day Three | Riven – Day Four | Riven – Day Five


I recently got an itch to revisit the Myst series of games. The serene yet subtly disturbing puzzle-oriented mysteries of Myst and Riven were ground-breaking for their day. I’m a gamer today primarily because of this universe.

68

A five-sided door.

This is my fourth post in the series. I’m now five hours into Riven. To date I have explored quite a bit of the five islands and uncovered more than a few uncomfortable facts about Gehn, the villain. I know that Catherine is still alive and imprisoned somewhere in the Fifth Age. I still need to recover the prison book that Atrus gave me and figure out where the Star Fissure is located.

Come with me as I continue my journey!

Fair warning: if you’ve never played Riven, there are spoilers ahead!


The Fifth Age: Riven – Day Two


realMyst
Riven – Day One | Riven – Day Two | Riven – Day Three | Riven – Day Four | Riven – Day Five


I recently got an itch to revisit a game series that, next to the first-gen Nintendo, is probably primarily responsible for getting me into gaming in the first place. The first game in this series is called Myst. The sequel is called Riven.

38

A wooden eye hides the D’ni number five.

I’m three hours into the game. In my previous entry I discovered it’s been long enough since I last played that I don’t remember many of the puzzles, and even though I still have my Myst adventure journal which has copious quantities of notes in it covering Myst, Riven, Exile, and some of Uru and Revelation, I’m making a conscious effort to not spoil myself by reaching for the book when I get stuck.

Let’s see what puzzles and curiosities the Riven islands hold for me today.

Fair warning: if you’ve never played Riven, there are spoilers ahead!


The Fifth Age: Riven – Day One


realMyst
Riven – Day One | Riven – Day Two | Riven – Day Three | Riven – Day Four | Riven – Day Five


I recently got an itch to revisit a game series that, next to the first-gen Nintendo, is probably primarily responsible for getting me into gaming in the first place. The first game in this series is called Myst. The sequel is called Riven.

D'ni number five.

D’ni number five.

Riven was released simultaneously for PC and Mac in 1997, and I must have picked it up right away. It starts off more or less right after Myst ends and is quite a bit longer and more involved compared to the first game. I have memories of playing it while still in high school. A friend played it at the same time and I remember talking with her over the phone about the puzzles we were both stuck on. Sometimes we would play together via phone and talk our way through what we saw.

Now I have Riven on Steam, and it’s time to walk the paths of the Fifth Age once more. Unlike realMyst, Riven has not (yet?) been updated for more modern machines and play; it’s still the point-and-click slideshow (with occasional Quicktime movies) puzzle adventure it originally was. A fan project called The Starry Expanse is working on updating the game with Cyan’s support, and I hope to see that succeed.

Fair warning: if you’ve never played Riven, there are spoilers ahead!


realMyst


realMyst
Riven – Day One | Riven – Day Two | Riven – Day Three | Riven – Day Four | Riven – Day Five


Presently, I have forty-one games in my Steam library (small, compared to many gamers) of which I’ve only played about half to completion or an end-game state. I tend not to be the type of gamer who rushes out and gets the newest release; my library is composed mainly of games I became fond of by watching other people play (with the intent to one day play them myself), as well as games I played in years past on much older operating systems that have since been digitized and rereleased.

Recently I got an itch to revisit a game series that, next to the first-gen Nintendo, is probably primarily responsible for getting me into gaming in the first place: Myst.

02

The Myst linking book.

Myst came out for Mac OS in 1993. I was twelve and didn’t have a computer at the time, but a few years later I started babysitting a couple of boys up the street whose mother was in graphic design and had a monstrous-sized Mac. The boys and I would play Myst on it together.

I was hooked. This game captured my interest like nothing else I’d experienced until then. As soon as I got my first PC (a Tandy!), Myst was a game I absolutely had to have. The original version was a point-and-click slideshow puzzle adventure with a few bits of Quicktime video slotted in. The version I bought came with an official Myst journal for the player to use. I still have this journal with all my penciled-in notes, sketches, and questions. It still has lots of blank pages in it for future adventures.

Later on, Rand and Robyn Miller, the original developers, also released some novels, and I had to have those too. And then the soundtrack. And then the sequel, and the soundtrack to that. And so on.

In 2000, realMyst: Interactive 3D Edition came out, and somewhere along the way I picked it up on Steam. It’s spiffier than the original in that the entire game has been redone to render in real-time and with 360° free movement. It has some new surprises tucked into it, but the textures are looking a bit dated by today’s standards. (There is a masterpiece edition of realMyst out that uses modern textures that I will purchase in the future.)

Regardless, for me, Myst has lost none of its charm. Over the last week I took my time revisiting this world and put just over eight hours of gametime into realMyst. I plan to progress through the rest of the series. Here is my adventure.

Fair warning: if you’ve never played Myst, there are spoilers ahead!